IAN is committed to producing practical, user-centered communications that foster a better understanding of science and enable readers to pursue new opportunities in research, education, and environmental problem-solving. Our publications synthesize scientific findings using effective science communication techniques.

Manassas National Battlefield Park (Page 1)

Manassas National Battlefield Park

Jane Hawkey, Tim Carruthers, Bill Dennison ·
20 December 2006

Manassas National Battlefield Park was established to preserve the scene of two major Civil War battles. Much of the landscape retains its wartime character with a patchwork of open fields and woodlots scattered across gently rolling hills. The 5,073 acre park is located within the northern VA Piedmont, approximately 45 miles southwest of Washington, DC. Many surrounding lands are becoming residential and industrial developments.

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Monocacy National Battlefield Park (Page 1)

Monocacy National Battlefield Park

Jane Hawkey, Tim Carruthers, Bill Dennison ·
20 December 2006

Monocacy National Battlefield is managed as a cultural resource commemorating the Civil War battle that took place along the Monocacy River south of Frederick, MD. The 1,647 acre park is dominated by active farms with some mixed hardwood forests and field/edge habitat. Like other battlefield parks, it has the challenge of combining the preservation of a historic landscape with natural resource management.

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National Capital Parks-East (Page 1)

National Capital Parks-East

Jane Hawkey, Tim Carruthers, Bill Dennison ·
20 December 2006

National Capital Parks-East includes 14 major sites covering over 8,000 acres within Washington, DC and three nearby counties in MD. The parks lie entirely within the Coastal Plain physiographic region and are managed for a variety of natural, cultural, and recreational resources.

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Rock Creek Park (Page 1)

Rock Creek Park

Jane Hawkey, Tim Carruthers, Bill Dennison ·
20 December 2006

Rock Creek Park is one of the largest forested urban parks in the United States, containing a wide variety of natural, historical, and recreational features in the midst of Washington, D.C. The majority of the 3,000 acre park surrounds the lower watershed of Rock Creek and its tributaries as the drainage drops from the Piedmont Plateau to the Coastal Plain.

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Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts (Page 1)

Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

Jane Hawkey, Tim Carruthers, Bill Dennison ·
20 December 2006

Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts is the only National Park dedicated to the performing arts. Performance structures on the 130 acre property include a 7,000-person main stage. The park includes protected stream, meadow, and forest patches in the urban Washington, DC landscape. Noise from the Dulles Toll Road threatens the primary function of the park as a performance venue and is a major management concern.

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An Eye Opening Approach to Integrated Environmental Assessments (Page 1)

An Eye Opening Approach to Integrated Environmental Assessments

Bill Dennison, Tim Carruthers, Jane Hawkey ·
6 February 2006

Environmental management is not practiced in a vacuum. Effective stewardship of natural resources requires the adoption of multiple objectives set forth by diverse groups of stakeholders with varied perspectives and interests. Within this management landscape, integrated environmental assessments provide a useful framework for evaluating resources and directing management efforts.

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Seagrasses of Southwest Australia (Page 1)

Seagrasses of Southwest Australia

Tim Carruthers, Tracey Saxby, Bill Dennison ·
4 November 2005

Southwest Australia has warm temperate water with a mixture of tropical influences from the Leeuwin Current and cool southern waters. This mixing of tropical and temperate water results in diverse seagrass communities occurring in a wide variety of coastal habitats. Almost half of the world's ~60 seagrass species can be found along this 1,500 km of coast. Seagrasses are important to the marine environment as they stabilise sediments and trap nutrients, helping to maintain water quality.

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Seagrasses of Southwest Australia: Estuaries (Page 1)

Seagrasses of Southwest Australia: Estuaries

Tim Carruthers, Tracey Saxby, Bill Dennison ·
3 November 2005

Estuaries are transition zones where rivers meet the ocean, creating an environment with large seasonal fl uctuations in temperature, salinity, and light. These difficult growing conditions provide some unique challenges for seagrasses. In southwest Australia, estuaries are usually closed by a sand bar at the mouth, cutting them off from the ebb and fl ow of the tide for long periods. Winter rains flow down-river into the estuaries, raising the water level until it breaks through the sand bar.

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Seagrasses of Southwest Australia: South Coast (Page 1)

Seagrasses of Southwest Australia: South Coast

Tim Carruthers, Tracey Saxby, Bill Dennison ·
2 November 2005

On the south coast, a diverse range of seagrasses grow in habitats protected from the full force of waves by islands and headlands. South coast seagrasses grow on silica sand to a depth of about 30 m and on carbonate sand beyond 30 m depth. Many seagrasses grow in these sheltered zones, including most of the species found on the west coast. Beyond the shelter of the headlands, waves roll in from the open ocean and seagrasses are subjected to very high wave action.

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