Blog posts categorized by Applying Science
Combining knowledge, power, and passion leads to societal paradigm shifts. Source: Integrating and Applying Science, Figure 2.13, pg. 25.

Ten recommendations for effectively communicating science: Part 2

Bill Dennison ·
18 July 2013
Science Communication | Applying Science | 

This blog is the second part to a two-part series of ten recommendations for effectively communicating science. Listed are five recommendations on ways to effectively communicate science. Recommendation 6. Build relationships that will make science communication more effective … We have found that building key relationships with decision makers and their staff is important in delivering meaningful scientific advice at the time of decision making.

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Map of monitoring stations in Chesapeake Bay (left) and researchers monitoring water quality of Chesapeake Bay (right).

Do not go gently into that black abyss of Chesapeake Bay monitoring cuts

Bill Dennison ·
9 July 2013
Applying Science | 

At the June Science and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) meeting and at the Science and Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) meeting, we were presented with the scenarios of a $1.1-1.2 million dollar cut to the Chesapeake Bay monitoring program. This would be a nearly 25% reduction of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funding for the tidal and non-tidal monitoring. This monitoring program, which has been occurring continuously since ca.

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Margaret Mead (1901-1978)

Top ten quotes that influenced my career

Bill Dennison ·
27 June 2013
Science Communication | Applying Science | 

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." Margaret Mead (1901-1978) This Margaret Mead quote is my favorite quote associated with building a team of competent people working on environmental issues. The quote is very empowering, as it reminds us that changing the world is not simply in the province of large organizations or powerful individuals.

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Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring

Are we having a Rachel Carson spring?

Bill Nuttle ·
6 June 2013
Applying Science |     1 comments

This spring brings hopeful signs of an environmental awakening. I woke up this morning thinking about Rachel Carson. I wasn’t thinking about the author, exactly. It was more to do with the period of the early 1960s when Rachel Carson made a difference - a period of growing environmental consciousness as a prelude to taking action. Could it be that we are now in a similar period with respect to climate change? That possibility has put me in a cautiously optimistic mood.

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The Sea Around Us by Rachel Carson

Top ten books about science that influenced my career

Bill Dennison ·
30 May 2013
Science Communication | Applying Science | Learning Science | 

The Sea Around Us, Rachel Carson … In seventh grade in Ohio, in the heartland of America and without ever actually seeing the ocean, I read Rachel Carson's The Sea Around Us. I had become very enamored in everything to do with water, but my experience was confined to freshwater in the streams, rivers and lakes of Ohio, Michigan and Canada.

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Global Seagrass Trajectory Working Group, sponsored by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. Left to right standing: Jud Kenworthy, Ken Heck, Randall Hughes, Fred Short, Ainsley Calladine, Suzanne Olyarnik, Susan WIlliams, MIchelle Waycott, Gary Kendrick, Jim Fourqurean, Carlos Duarte. Left to right sitting: Bob Orth, Bill Dennison, Tim Carruthers.

Scientific synthesis at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: Part 4--Moving beyond synthesis

Bill Dennison ·
23 May 2013
Applying Science | 

This post is part four of a four part series on scientific synthesis. In some cases, scientific synthesis is not the end product, rather it can be the start of a science application effort. In a case study to demonstrate the use of scientific synthesis which led to a science application effort, I will recount our efforts regarding global seagrass trajectories.

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Tropical Connections from IAN Press has 157 authors.

Scientific synthesis at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: Part 3--Integration and Application Network approach to synthesis

Bill Dennison ·
21 May 2013
Applying Science | 

This post is part three of a four part series on scientific synthesis. The Integration and Application Network (IAN) was created to facilitate scientific synthesis as part of science applications. In many respects, the linking of integration with application is crucial, and IAN projects tend to use synthesis in order to create effective applications. The IAN approach to synthesis is similar to the previous blogs (Parts 1 & 2 of this series) in many ways:

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University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science faculty discussion in scientific synthesis at Appalachian Laboratory.

Scientific synthesis at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: Part 2--Faculty discussion about creating a 'Synthesis Addiction'

Bill Dennison ·
17 May 2013
Applying Science | 

This post is part two of a four part series on scientific synthesis. At our annual UMCES Faculty Convocation organized by the Appalachian Laboratory faculty senators Drs. Katia Englehardt and Matt Fitzpatrick, we discussed scientific synthesis and asked ourselves the following 4 questions: 1) How do we approach synthesis?, 2) How does UMCES facilitate synthesis?, 3) What are the challenges to doing synthesis within UMCES? and 4) What needs to change to become better in synthesis? We had Drs.

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Scientific synthesis at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: Part 1--Overview

Bill Dennison ·
15 May 2013
Applying Science | 

This post is part one of a four part series on scientific synthesis. The word synthesis is derived from the Greek word, syntithenai meaning 'to put together', and was first used in the latter part of the 1500s. The word integration is derived from the Latin word, integratus meaning 'to render whole', and was first used in the early 1600s. In the context of scientific synthesis or integration, the definition of these two words converge.

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Paul Greenfield visiting with IAN.

Paul Greenfield: A human catalyst

Bill Dennison ·
3 May 2013
Applying Science |     1 comments

Professor Paul Greenfield was my mentor both at the University of Queensland and in the Healthy Waterways campaign. Paul recently retired from his role as Vice Chancellor of the University of Queensland and I would like to provide my perspective on his role as a human catalyst. Sometimes the most difficult thing to measure is the most important thing, for example, the action of a catalyst is absolutely critical for a reaction to take place, but it is difficult to measure.

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