Blog posts categorized by Applying Science
Route map to Kakadu National Park from Darwin. Credit: Google Maps

Ancient culture and unique biodiversity - Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia

Jane Hawkey ·
9 June 2015
Science Communication | Applying Science | Learning Science | 

On May 22 and 23, Heath Kelsey and I had the opportunity to travel to Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory, the “top end” of Australia. The park covers some 20,000km2, making it Australia's largest national park. Our site visit provided the context for the project we were visiting Charles Darwin University for - to help synthesize and communicate the key findings of the National Environment Research Programme (NERP) scientists studying the Kakadu floodplains.

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Photos of olive hymenachne (top) and paragrass (bottom). Photo credit: Northern Territory Government Weed Management Branch and Michael Douglas.

Invasive grasses pose a threat to natural and cultural resources in Kakadu National Park

Heath Kelsey ·
4 June 2015
Science Communication | Applying Science | Learning Science | 

As part of our synthesis of research findings related to National Environment Research Programme (NERP) work on Kakadu National Park floodplains, I am interviewing scientists to begin distilling the key messages for the synthesis story. These researchers are contributing to the developing picture of the connections between the floodplains, water movement, and important natural and cultural resources.

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Yellow Waters Billabong, Kakadu National Park. Photo credit: Heath Kelsey

Water, food webs, and production on the Kakadu floodplains

Heath Kelsey ·
2 June 2015
Science Communication | Applying Science | Learning Science | 

As part of our synthesis of research findings related to National Environment Research Programme (NERP) work on Kakadu National Park floodplains, I am interviewing scientists to begin distilling the key messages for the synthesis story. These researchers are contributing to the developing picture of the connections between the floodplains, water movement, and important natural and cultural resources. Yellow Waters Billabong, Kakadu National Park. Photo credit:

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Science for Environmental Management 2015 poem

Bill Dennison ·
10 May 2015
Science Communication | Applying Science | Learning Science | 

Fifteen students from four campuses met each week … After watching YouTube lectures and reading a lot … Our class time flew by, did it not … Facilitators led the discussion, insights they did seek. And the rapporteur provided the discussion summary … So that the author could draft up a synthesis blog … Clarifying the topic by avoiding intellectual fog … And posting as many blogs as the Internet could carry.

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The US Constitution (top) and map of Chesapeake Bay Watershed (bottom). Images from Flickr and the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement 2014.

Developing a constitution for Chesapeake Bay

Bill Dennison ·
17 April 2015
Science Communication | Applying Science | 

At a recent roundtable discussion of approaches for accelerating Chesapeake Bay restoration, one of the participants used the phrase "We the people..." which provoked me to think of the preamble to the United States Constitution, the beginning of an amazingly robust document that still resonates today. I hope that the 2014 Chesapeake Bay and Watershed Agreement will also have longevity and resonance, so I adapted the agreement into constitutional language as follows:

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Professor Jay Zieman (1943-2015). Photo from http://www.evsc.virginia.edu/

In memory of Jay Zieman, University of Virginia seagrass ecologist

Bill Dennison ·
10 April 2015
Applying Science | Learning Science |     1 comments

Joseph "Jay" C. Zieman (1943-2015), my seagrass ecology colleague, died recently. I first met Jay in Biloxi, Mississippi in 1980 when my Master's thesis advisor C. Peter McRoy organized a workshop associated with the Seagrass Ecosystem Study, funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration.

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