Publications about Chesapeake Bay

IAN is committed to producing practical, user-centered communications that foster a better understanding of science and enable readers to pursue new opportunities in research, education, and environmental problem-solving. Our publications synthesize scientific findings using effective science communication techniques.

Influence of Reservoir Infill on Coastal Deep Water Hypoxia (Page 1)

Influence of Reservoir Infill on Coastal Deep Water Hypoxia

Linker LC, Batiuk RA, Cerco CF, Shenk GW, Tian R, Wang P, and Yactayo G ·
2016

Ecological restoration of the Chesapeake through the Chesapeake Bay total maximum daily load (TMDL) requires the reduction of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment loads in the Chesapeake watershed because of the tidal water quality impairments and damage to living resources they cause. Within the Chesapeake watershed, the Conowingo Reservoir has been filling in with sediment for almost a century and is now in a state of near-full capacity called dynamic equilibrium.

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Long-Term Changes in Sediment and Nutrient Delivery from Conowingo Dam to Chesapeake Bay: Effects of Reservoir Sedimentation (Page 1)

Long-Term Changes in Sediment and Nutrient Delivery from Conowingo Dam to Chesapeake Bay: Effects of Reservoir Sedimentation

Qian Zhang, Robert M. Hirsch, and William P. Ball ·
2016

Reduction of suspended sediment (SS), total phosphorus (TP), and total nitrogen is an important focus for Chesapeake Bay watershed management. The Susquehanna River, the bay’s largest tributary, has drawn attention because SS loads from behind Conowingo Dam (near the river’s mouth) have been rising dramatically. To better understand these changes, we evaluated histories of concentration and loading (1986−2013) using data from sites above and below Conowingo Reservoir.

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2014 Chesapeake Bay Report Card (Page 1)

2014 Chesapeake Bay Report Card

Caroline Donovan, Bill Dennison, Alexandra Fries ·
8 September 2015

This report card provides a transparent, timely, and geographically detailed assessment of Chesapeake Bay. In 2014, the report card includes five water quality indicators and two biotic indicators. In 2014, the overall grade for Chesapeake Bay is a 50%, a C. This means the Bay is in moderate health. A fisheries index and climate change resilience index as well as trajectories of reporting region health are also presented. For further details, visit the Report Card website.

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Healthy Harbor Report Card 2014 (Page 1)

Healthy Harbor Report Card 2014

12 June 2015

The annual West & Rhode Rivers report card was released on June 12th, 2015. It presents data and information on six different ecological health indicators. It also gives examples of what the public can do to improve health of the rivers.

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2013 Chesapeake Bay Report Card (Page 1)

2013 Chesapeake Bay Report Card

Caroline Donovan, Bill Dennison, Alexandra Fries, Tracey Saxby, Heath Kelsey ·
23 May 2014

This report card provides a transparent, timely, and geographically detailed assessment of Chesapeake Bay. In 2013, the report card includes five water quality indicators and two biotic indicators. In 2013, the overall grade for Chesapeake Bay is a 45%, a C. This means the Bay is in moderate health. Fisheries indicators as well as trajectories of reporting region health are also presented. For further details, visit the Report Card website.

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Oyster delta N-15 as a Bioindicator of Potential Wastewater and Poultry Farming Impacts and Degraded Water Quality in a Subestuary of Chesapeake Bay (Page 1)

Oyster delta N-15 as a Bioindicator of Potential Wastewater and Poultry Farming Impacts and Degraded Water Quality in a Subestuary of Chesapeake Bay

Fertig B, Carruthers TJB, and Dennison WC ·
2014

Anthropogenic nitrogen contributes to water quality degradation, but it is difficult to distinguish sources once they are mixed in coastal ecosystems. Natural abundances of stable nitrogen isotopes (delta N-15) were measured in oyster (Crassostrea virginica) tissues (muscle, gills, and mantle) during summer 2006 to summer 2008 to identify nitrogen sources in Monie Bay (a subestuary of Chesapeake Bay) receiving freshwater inputs from three tributary creeks. The creeks (estimated flushing times:

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