Blog posts categorized by Environmental Report Cards
WWF booth. Photo credit: Catherine Blancard

Get the grade - Worldwide WWF-IAN partnership launches in Stockholm

Simon Costanzo ·
27 October 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | 

This blog is part of the Basin Report Card Initiative: a partnership between the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) Our partnership with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) was officially launched at World Water Week this past August 2015. This new partnership aims to widen the audience and uptake of report cards as an environmental management tool for river basins around the world.

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The final Long Island Sound Report Card. – inner spread of LIS report card

Lessons learned during the Long Island Sound report card process

Alexandra Fries ·
20 October 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | Applying Science | 

Caroline Donovan and I were invited to speak at the joint meeting of the Long Island Sound’s Citizens Advisory (CAC) and Science and Technical Advisory Committees (STAC). After completing the Long Island Sound Report Card in June, they asked us to give some wrap up and next steps information for where the report card is going in the future. Overall, the Long Island Sound report card included water quality, human health, and ecosystem/habitat indicators.

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Many participants joined us for the workshop from a range of areas throughout the Guaviare River Basin.

Guaviare River Report Card Workshop

Alexandra Fries ·
15 October 2015
Environmental Report Cards | 

This blog is part of the Basin Report Card Initiative: a partnership between the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) On September 21st, 2015, Simon Costanzo and I traveled to San Jose de Guaviare, Colombia for the Guaviare River Report Card Workshop. This was the third workshop in Colombia to develop report cards for three tributaries of the Orinoco River.

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Three rivers meet in Puerto Carreño, from left to right, the Meta, Orinoco, and Bita Rivers.

Bita River Report Card Workshop - The Orinoco River Basin, Colombia

Alexandra Fries ·
16 September 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | Applying Science | 

This blog is part of the Basin Report Card Initiative: a partnership between the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) On August 9th, 2015, Simon Costanzo and I traveled from Bogota, Colombia to Puerto Carreño, Vichada, Colombia for the Bita River Report Card Workshop. This was the second of three workshops that will occur in Colombia, to develop report cards for three tributaries of the Orinoco River.

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The lakes surrounding Puerto Lopez, Colombia.

The Meta River Report Card Workshop - The Orinoco River Basin, Colombia

Alexandra Fries ·
23 July 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | 

This blog is part of the Basin Report Card Initiative: a partnership between the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) On June 29th, 2015, Simon Costanzo and I traveled from Bogota, Colombia to Puerto Lopez, Colombia for the Meta River Report Card Workshop. The workshop spanned from June 30th-July 2nd, and was the first of three workshops that will occur in Colombia, to develop report cards for three tributaries of the Orinoco River.

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Participants of the first workshop, December 12-13 2013, Taal Vista Hotel, Tagaytay City

Development of an Ecosystem Health Report Card for Laguna de Bay, Philippines

Vanessa Vargas-Nguyen ·
16 July 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | Applying Science | 

This summer, I was given the great opportunity to be involved in the development of the first IAN report card in my home country. Last June 1-3 2015, Dave Nemazie and Simon Costanzo joined me in the Philippines to help facilitate the Second Workshop on the Development of Ecosystem Health Report Card for Laguna de Bay.

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Charles Darwin’s 1842 map of coral reef distribution.

Diving into NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program

Caroline Donovan ·
14 July 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | Applying Science | 

Even before Charles Darwin wrote about coral reef atolls in his 1842 “The Structure and Distribution of Coral Reefs,” humans have been fascinated by coral reefs. Corals and coral reefs are connected to the spiritual rituals of indigenous populations. They also provide food, shelter, and support livelihoods (through fishing and ecotourism) of many people around the world. Charles Darwin’s 1842 map of coral reef distribution. Current coral reef distribution. Credit:

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Crocodiles at Crocodylus Park in Darwin Australia. Credit Heath Kelsey

Crocodile report cards

Heath Kelsey ·
30 June 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Learning Science | 

I had the unique opportunity to discuss report cards with a couple of global crocodile experts based in Darwin. Grahame Webb and Charlie Manolis are active in crocodile management and conservation globally, and operate Crocodylus Park in Darwin, a crocodile farm and research facility. Grahame is chair of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Crocodile Specialist Group, and Charlie is Chief Scientist at Crocodylus Park.

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The King of Cambodia is an elected monarch, making Cambodia one of the few elected monarchies of the world. Credit: Simon Costanzo

IAN in Cambodia

Simon Costanzo ·
25 June 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | 

This blog is part of the Basin Report Card Initiative: a partnership between the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) The King of Cambodia is an elected monarch, making Cambodia one of the few elected monarchies of the world. Credit: Simon Costanzo … Wow, my travel adventures through our new partnership with WWF continue in 2015 with a trip to Cambodia in south-east Asia.

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