Blog posts categorized by Environmental Report Cards
The cover of the report card.

The Road to Rio – The Release of the Guanabara Bay Report Card

Alexandra Fries ·
17 August 2017
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | 

On July 21, 2017, the Guanabara Bay Report Card was released in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is the first ecosystem health report card in Brazil, and the second report card we have done in South America. The first report card in South America was for the Orinoco River in Colombia last year. For the Guanabara Bay Report Card, we partnered with PSAM (Environmental Sanitation Program of the municipalities surrounding the Guanabara Bay) with support from the Inter-American Development Bank.

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Mongolia: Land of the Eternal Blue Sky. Photo credit Bill Dennison

In the Footsteps of Gengis Khan in the Mongolian Steppe: Part 3

Bill Dennison ·
25 July 2017
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | 

Training Mongolians to Develop a Tuul River Report Card … After our field trip, Simon Costanzo, Michele Thieme and I held a two and a half day workshop in Ulaanbaatar, working closely with WWF Mongolia and key stakeholders in order to develop the skills and strategies needed to create a Tuul River report card. We structured the workshop around the five steps of report card development: Conceptualization, Choose indicators, Determine thresholds, Calculate scores and Communicate results.

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Bill Dennison, Michele Thieme and Simon Costanzo in front of the Parliament House in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Photo Credit Bill Dennison

In the Footsteps of Gengis Khan in the Mongolian Steppe: Part 1

Bill Dennison ·
18 July 2017
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | Applying Science | 

From July 2nd- 4th, 2017, Simon Costanzo, Michele Thieme and I took a day to walk around the capital of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar (Ulan Bator) and two days on driving tours to see both upstream and downstream sections of the Tuul River. This blog installment provides the first part of a synopsis of these field trips in anticipation of our Tuul River report card workshop. Ulaanbaatar … Ulaanbaatar centers around a large public square. Behind this square is Parliament House.

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Jane Hawkey photographing on a beach. Photo credit Simon Costanzo

Jane Hawkey, the Integration and Application Network ‘Closer’ retiring

Bill Dennison ·
11 July 2017
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication |     1 comments

Before starting at the Integration and Application Network (IAN) in 2005, Jane Hawkey worked for Washington Sea Grant, and then as a research assistant for several different Horn Point Laboratory faculty. There, she attended research cruises, produced newsletters and helped with publication graphics. These skills and experiences helped her when she joined IAN. She rose to IAN Senior Science Communicator within a short time period.

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Our University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and Chesapeake Bay Program Staff met at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center to introduce themselves, and discuss the IAN report card and brand. Image credit: James Currie

Annual IAN Retreat at Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center

Bill Dennison ·
23 June 2017
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | 

The Integration and Application Network annual retreat was held at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center on Kent Narrows on May 31. Two dozen IAN staff spent the day introducing themselves to each other, discussing the IAN report card and the IAN brand. This annual gathering includes our University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and Chesapeake Bay Program staff (UMCES@CBP).

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Map of the location of the Three Gorges Dam. Image credit: Rolfmueller (commons) – Rolfmueller (wp-en) - from en wp, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=716968

Three Gorges Dam Visit

Simon Costanzo ·
21 June 2017
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | Learning Science |     2 comments

In April I travelled to China to discuss report cards with WWF China. Following the workshop (outlined in a previous blog), I was extremely lucky to be taken on a guided tour of the Three Gorges Dam that spans the Yangzte River in Hubei Province. Now this ain’t just any dam, it’s the biggest hydroelectricity generating dam in the world with a capacity of 85 terrawatt hours per year, or a 10th of China’s whole energy budget! Can you imagine?!

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The 5-day SESYNC short course on Social Network Analysis was taught by Lorien Jasny. Image credit: Vanessa Vargas-Nguyen

Adding value to “Network” in IAN: Exploring the potential uses of Social Network Analysis

Vanessa Vargas-Nguyen ·
19 June 2017
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication | Applying Science |     1 comments

Last June 5-9, 2017, I was fortunate enough to be selected to participate in SESYNC’s short course on Social Network Analysis (SNA) taught by Lorien Jasny, PhD, who was a postdoc at SESYNC but is now based at Exeter University in the UK. This introduction and crash course on Social Network Analysis was a great opportunity for me, as I will be using SNA in my dissertation research.

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A busy two days on the porch at UMCES Center Administration offices in Cambridge. Image credit: Heath Kelsey

WWF and UMCES Retreat 24-25 May 2017

Heath Kelsey ·
16 June 2017
Environmental Literacy | Environmental Report Cards | 

The WWF-UMCES Partnership met at the UMCES Horn Point Lab Campus in Cambridge, MD on May 24 and 25 this year for our annual two-day retreat. This year’s agenda was, as usual, very ambitious, including the introduction of new people, discussions on branding the partnership, the incorporation of climate change indicators into the report card process, modeling for scenario development, and reviews of upcoming communication products.

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In the meeting reviewing the Guanabara Bay Report Card. Image credit: Alex Fries

Finalizing the Guanabara Bay Report Card

Alexandra Fries ·
12 June 2017
Environmental Report Cards |     1 comments

On April 24th, 2017, Dave Nemazie and I began our journey to Rio de Janeiro. Little did we know, instead of taking 18 hours to get there, it would take 30. We flew through JFK, and a delayed flight meant we missed our connection to Rio. After spending the day in New York, we finally arrived a day after we were supposed to. Despite our travel woes, we made it to Rio and had productive meetings with our partners, Guido Gelli and Marlus Newton.

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